Last edited by Moogulmaran
Sunday, July 12, 2020 | History

5 edition of Recollecting Plato"s Meno found in the catalog.

Recollecting Plato"s Meno

by Harold Tarrant

  • 317 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by Duckworth Publishers .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ancient Greek & Roman philosophy,
  • Literary Criticism,
  • Literature - Classics / Criticism,
  • Hellenic languages,
  • Ancient, Classical & Medieval,
  • History & Surveys - Ancient & Classical,
  • Philosophy / Ancient,
  • Ancient and Classical

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages240
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7833558M
    ISBN 100715632914
    ISBN 109780715632918

    The Theory of Recollection is laid out in more detail in Plato's Meno, and the discussion in the Phaedo alludes to, and seems to assume prior knowledge of, this earlier discussion. The Phaedo and the Meno are consistent, though, and the presentation of the theory in each dialogue can stand on its own.   He is the author of numerous books, and he has translated Plato's "Meno" for Focus Publishing, as well as edited two volumes of readings on Liberty. Laurence Berns () earned his PhD from the University of Chicago and was a Tutor at St John's College, Annapolis for many years where he enjoyed a long and distinguished : Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.

    Meno’s Paradox A Puzzle about Definitions Socrates has told us he knows how to reject faulty definitions. But how does he know when he has succeeded in finding the right definition? Meno raises an objection to the entire definitional search in the form of (what has been called) “Meno’s Paradox,” or “The Paradox of Inquiry” (Meno 80d-e). One feature of the dialogue is Socrates' use of one of Meno's slaves to demonstrate his idea of anamnesis, that certain knowledge is innate and "recollected" by the soul through proper inquiry. The dialogues of Plato - Early, Transitional and middle, Later middle, Phaedo, Later .

    SOCRATES: O Meno, there was a time when the Thessalians were famous among the other Hellenes only for their riches and their riding; but now, if I am not mistaken, they are equally famous for their wisdom, especially at Larisa, which is the native city of your friend Aristippus. And this is Gorgias' doing; for when he came there, theFile Size: KB. The dialogue between Socrates and Meno starts when Meno asks “What is virtue and can it be taught?” Meno attempts to define virtue by saying that it is ruling over people justly and moderately. Socrates agrees that justice and moderation are a part of virtue but do not make up virtue as a whole.


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Recollecting Plato"s Meno by Harold Tarrant Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Recollecting Plato's Meno examines both the dialogue itself and the response to it of Plato's successors, from Aristotle and spurious Platonic dialogues, through Cicero and an anonymous commentator on the Theaetetus, to the Neoplatonists.

About Recollecting Plato's Meno. Plato's Meno is a dynamic and entertaining examination of Recollecting Platos Meno book nature and origin of the kind of excellence displayed by successful Greek leaders. That such excellence existed was difficult to deny, but people expected to show it often disappointed, and others expected to know about it seemed confused.

Meno [Plato] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Meno is initially moved by the myth and its “secret teaching” about recollection but then lapses immediately into his view of learning as getting-something-from-a-teacher, as he asks Socrates: “Can you teach me how this can be” (81E).

Meno [Plato] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Meno is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato. It attempts to determine the definition of virtue, or arete/5(20). To my mind the Meno is among the most mysterious of Plato's dialogues.

Beginning with a discussion as to whether virtue can be taught, the interlocutors move into an inquiry into the nature of knowledge itself. Here we get a famous scene in which Plato demonstrates his theory of knowledge as recollection through an illustration in geometry/5(9).

Meno is an absorbing look at the question of human virtue. As in most of Plato's dialogues, Meno features Socrates engaging a prominent thinker and attempting to draw 4/5(16). SOCRATES: I told you, Meno, just now that you were a rogue, and now you ask whether I can teach you, when I am saying that there is no teaching, but only recollection; and thus you imagine that you will involve me in a contradiction.

MENO: Indeed, Socrates, I protest that I had no such intention. The slave boy demonstration: Meno asks Socrates if he can prove that "all learning is recollection." Socrates responds by calling over a slave boy, who he establishes has had no mathematical training, and setting him a geometry problem.

Drawing a square in the dirt, Socrates asks the boy how to double the area of the : Emrys Westacott. One of the most famous passages in all of Plato's works—indeed, in all of philosophy—occurs in the middle of the Meno.

Meno asks Socrates if he can prove the truth of his strange claim that "all learning is recollection" (a claim that Socrates connects to the idea of reincarnation). Socrates responds by calling over a slave boy and, after establishing that he has had Author: Emrys Westacott.

On the other hand, in the 6th and 7th books of the Republic we reach the highest and most perfect conception, which Plato is able to attain, of the nature of knowledge. The ideas are now finally seen to be one as well as many, causes as well as ideas, and to have a unity which is the idea of good and the cause of all the rest.

In his Socratic dialogues The Phaedo and The Meno, Plato advances a theory concerning the acquisition of human these dialogues, Plato asserts that people acquire knowledge through recollection; that is, nothing is learned new, from experience.

Knowledge exists a priori in the human soul, and while certain experiences may trigger the recollection of a priori truths, knowledge comes.

Recollecting Plato's Meno. [Harold Tarrant] -- "Plato's Meno is a dynamic and entertaining examination of the nature and origin of the kind of excellence displayed by successful Greek leaders. That such excellence existed was difficult to deny. Plato & the Meno: Recollection What is the essential difference between belief, knowledge or true understanding.

How can it be defined, what are its origins, and how is it attained. Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. By: Plato ( BCE) Meno (Ancient Greek: Μένων) is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato.

Written in the Socratic dialectic style, it attempts to determine the definition of virtue, or arete, meaning in this case virtue in general, rather than particular virtues, such as justice or temperance.1/5(1). The elaboration of the concept almost appears to be a consequence of Plato himself re-reading the Meno in search of inspiration.

That said and despite Plato’s inclinations to put words into Socrates’ mouth, the concept of recollection might actually be one we can assign to the older thinker. This is Socrates' (and Plato's) solution to the problem of how we can try to find out the nature of something we do not yet know.

Socrates can now advise Meno that "you should always confidently try to seek out and recollect what you do not know at present--that is, what you do not recollect.". Meno Alumni Books Hillside Ave, Needham, Massachusetts,USA Tel: Email: [email protected] OR Call UK office Meno Recollections Ltd 4 Dunston Road, Battersea, London SW11 5QU, UK Tel: +44 20   Meno: in this dialogue, featuring Socrates and a visitor to Athens named Meno, the legendary philosopher Plato addresses the question "Can virtue be taught?".

Try the new Google Books. Check out the new look and enjoy easier access to your favorite features. Try it now. G Transmigration and Recollection before Plato.

The Hypothetical Method. E The Date of the Meno. Plato's Meno: Commentary.Meno is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato. It attempts to determine the definition of virtue, or arete, meaning virtue in general, rather than particular virtues, such as justice or temperance.

The first part of the work is written in the Socratic dialectical style and Meno is reduced to confusion or aporia/5(15).Be Book-Smarter. SparkNotes is brought to you by Barnes & Noble. Visit to buy new and used textbooks, and check out our award-winning NOOK tablets and eReaders.